Combat Action medal
HOMENEW ADDITIONSSITE MAPINTRODUCTION
FOREWORDINVOCATION1. WALTER S. SAVAGE, JR.2.  DE-386 (WWII)
3.  DE-386 CREW4.  DE-386 CREW PHOTOS5.  DE-386 SHIP PHOTOS6.  DER-386 (1955)
7.  DER CREW 1955 - 19648.  DER-386 PHOTOS9.  SAVAGE IN VIETNAM10.  VIETNAM CREW
11.  VIETNAM PHOTOS12.  SHIP'S AWARDS13.  ACTIVE SERVICE TERMINATED14.  REUNION ASSOCIATION
15.  DECEASED16.  ROSTER17  REUNION PHOTOS18.  KEEPSAKES
19.  MISCELLANEOUS20.  SITE POLICIES21.  WEBMASTER22.  SHIP'S STORE
23.  SITE AWARDS24.  COMMANDING OFFICERS 25.  SHIP'S HISTORY

Daniel P. Farley
"Arriving at Norfolk, VA., on Jan. 12, 1944, we picked up a convoy of 78 ships.  This was the first of many  trips  back  and  fourth  across  the  Atlantic  Ocean  escorting  troop ships, freighters, tankers, etc.   With  Radar  and Sonar systems, the DE's were ever on the alert for Nazi planes and submarines.

On the morning of April 1, 1944, we were awakened by the 'clang clang' of "Battle Stations." Jumping out of our bunks, and up the ladder, the clang clang was like my heart beat.  The convoy was being attacked by German planes.  This was in the Mediterranean Sea between Oran and Algiers, N. Africa. One freighter was hit, and the rest of the Convoy arrived safely at Bizerte, Tunisia. With  a  hundred ships  firing,  the  sky  lit  up  like  the Fourth  of  July.

During rough seas, we all took quite a beating.  On those days, we were allowed to stay in our bunks when off duty.  Up in the Radio Shack, our chairs were welded to the floor, and at our feet was a bucket.  It was tough copying code and using the bucket at the same time.   We typed 'garbled sigs.'

On many occasions, the Sea was too rough for the Cooks, so we had to eat sandwiches. Bouncing around, we ate standing up, with one hand holding on to the table, and the other holding the sandwich.

Our saddest day was when Ed Moritz, coming off watch, opened the side hatchway, and when the ship rolled, it slammed on him.  A Doctor from the USS Winslow DE 359 was transferred at night to the Savage.  He and our pharmacist mate Doherty kept him alive with oxygen tanks.  We left the Convoy, and Capt. Ridgley brought the ship to full speed ahead to the Brooklyn  Navy  Yard.  Ed  was taken  to  the  hospital,  but  died  soon after.

Before our next trip on July 24, 1944, the Savage left Boston for Casco Bay, Portland Maine for training.  We left Casco on August 7 '44 with 64 of the Crew on report, and restricted due to disorderly  conduct  ashore.   It  was  a  Bar-room  Brawl.  Navy  vs.  Coast Guard.

Another  time  when  the  North  Atlantic  was never rougher... a sailor from the flagship USS Winslow washed overboard and was lost sight of for 40 minutes.  Finally, he was spotted and  picked up by the Savage.   We  were  all  elated  to  save  him.   And  so was he.   He  was  a  Navy  man and said 'I'll never  razz  the  Coast  Guard  again.'

Mr. Tibbets was the favorite officer of all the crew.  He was being transferred to another ship.  We hated   to   see   him   leave   and   everyone   lined   up   to   shake   his  hand and  wish  him  well. 

At one place, somebody gave me a violin.  I played tunes with another guy who had a guitar.  One Sunday, Ens. Dickson was giving a special Religious service on the fantail and asked me to play  the violin.  I didn't know any religious songs, so he said 'play anything.' The only thing I could think of was (of all things) Tommy Dorsey's 'Getting sentimental over you...'

In April, '45, there was a collision in the Convoy.  A Tanker 'St. Maihial' and a cargo vessel. The tanker burned  and  lost  35  men.

April 12, '45, President Roosevelt died.  Colors at half mast for 30 days.  We held services on the gun deck for the late president.

Between  all  these  trips,  were  many  great  liberties... in  England, Northern Ireland, several ports in No.  Africa,  and  especially  New  York  City."
[Text and photos above were most graciously donated by Mr. Daniel P. Farley.]

[2009 photograph by Edward P. Stone.]

[Job description from:  "What kind of job can I get in the Navy?"  United States Navy Department Pamphlet - circa 1942.]

Ruptured Duck patch representing an
Honorable Discharge.
Dan Farley on deck.
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Daniel P. Farley, RM2c header
Daniel P. Farley, RM2c
SECTION 3.
scan of Dan Farley's U. S. Coast Guard identification card
scan of Dan Farley's Savage campaign card
Dan Farley at radio.
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SECTION 3. CONTENTS
BACK TO SECTION 2.W. Paul Baumgarner, MoMM2cRollins W. Coakley, Y1c
Ralph M. Cooke, M. D.James L. Corsano, GM2cFamily - G. O. Day
History - G. O. DayHistory - G. O. Day (2)QM Duties - G. O. Day
Honorable DischargeHonorable Discharge (2)Honorable Discharge (3)
Presidential CertificatePhoto QM1c G. O. DayTribute - G. O. Day
G. O. Day - WWII MedalsDaniel P. Farley, RM2cGordon B. Hamrick, CSTD
Thomas F. Honner, MoMM2cMorrie J. Stein,  RdM1c

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Proud to be a WWII Veteran medal
Proud to be an American Veteran medal
Honorable discharge - Ruptured Duck patch
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Place of entry into Savage service:  Sandy Hook Bay, NY 11 January, 1944.

Place of separation from Savage service: Adak, Alaska 12 October, 1945.
photograph of Dan Farley
Radioman second class insignia
photograph of Dan Farley at radio
"Domain of the Golden Dragon" card
photograph of Dan Farley on deck
USN Good Conduct medal
Asiatic Pacific Campaign medal
Combat Action
(retroactive)

Qualifying criteria:

for participation in ground 
or surface combat during 
any period on or after 07 
December, 1941, and or 
before 01 March, 1961.
USN Good Conduct  

Qualifying criteria: outstanding performance and conduct 
during 3 years of 
continuous active 
enlisted service.  
Asiatic Pacific Campaign 

Qualifying criteria
service in the 
Asiatic - Pacific 
theater for 30 days or receipt of any combat decoration.  
Qualifying dates: 
07 December, 1941 - 
02 March, 1946.  
Medal was not awarded 
until 1947 when General Douglas MacArthur received the first one.
European African Middle Eastern Campaign medal (with one Battle Star)
European African Middle 
Eastern Campaign  
(with one battle star)

Qualifying criteria:  
service in the 
European-African-Middle 
Eastern theater for 30 days 
or receipt of any combat 
decoration.  
Qualifying dates:  
07 December, 1941 - 
08 November, 1945.  
Medal was not awarded 
until 1947 when General 
Dwight David Eisenhower 
received the first one.
American Campaign medal
American Campaign

Qualifying criteria:
service outside the 
United States
in the 
American theater 
for 30 days or 
within the continental  
United States for 1 year.
WWII Victory   

Qualifying criteria:
awarded for service in 
United States Armed
 Forces between 
1941 - 1946.
WWII Victory medal
Medals earned by Daniel P. Farley
photograph of Daniel P. Farley - 2009
Dan Farley at 2009 Savage reunion.
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